Host-related life history traits in interspecific hybrids of cactophilic Drosophila

Authors

  • E. M. Soto,

    Corresponding author
      *Correspondence: E-mail: edusoto@ege.fcen.uba.ar
    Search for more papers by this author
  • I. M. Soto,

    1. Departamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II (C1428 EHA), Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Search for more papers by this author
  • V. P. Carreira,

    1. Departamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II (C1428 EHA), Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. J. Fanara,

    1. Departamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II (C1428 EHA), Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Search for more papers by this author
  • E. Hasson

    1. Departamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II (C1428 EHA), Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Search for more papers by this author

*Correspondence: E-mail: edusoto@ege.fcen.uba.ar

Abstract

In the genus Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae), interspecific hybridization is a rare phenomenon. However, recent evidence suggests a certain degree of introgression between the cactophilic siblings Drosophila buzzatii Patterson & Wheeler and Drosophila koepferae Fontdevila & Wasserman. In this article, we analyzed larval viability and developmental time of hybrids between males of D. buzzatii and females of D. koepferae, raised in media prepared with fermenting tissues of natural host plants that these species utilize in nature as breeding sites. In all cases, developmental time and larval viability in hybrids was not significantly different from parental lines and, depending on the cross, hybrids developed faster than both parental species or than the slowest species. When data of wing length were included in a discriminant function analysis, we observed that both species can be clearly differentiated, while hybrids fell in two categories, one intermediate between parental species and the other consisting of extreme phenotypes. Thus, our results point out that hybrid fitness, as measured by developmental time and viability, is not lower than in the parental species.

Ancillary