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Predicting Competitive-Unethical Negotiating Behavior and Its Consequences

Authors

  • Roger Volkema,

    Corresponding author
    1. American University in Washington, DC, and IAG/PUC in Rio de Janeiro
      Roger Volkema is an associate professor of management at American University in Washington, DC, and IAG/PUC in Rio de Janeiro. His e-mail address is volkema@american.edu.
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  • Denise Fleck,

    Corresponding author
    1. Coppead Graduate School of Business/UFRJ in Rio de Janeiro
      Denise Fleck is vice-dean academic of Coppead Graduate School of Business/UFRJ in Rio de Janeiro. Her e-mail address is denise@coppead.ufrj.br.
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  • Agnes Hofmeister

    Corresponding author
    1. Corvinus University in Budapest
      Agnes Hofmeister is dean of the faculty of business administration at Corvinus University in Budapest. Her e-mail address is agnes.hofmeister@uni-corvinus.hu.
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Roger Volkema is an associate professor of management at American University in Washington, DC, and IAG/PUC in Rio de Janeiro. His e-mail address is volkema@american.edu.

Denise Fleck is vice-dean academic of Coppead Graduate School of Business/UFRJ in Rio de Janeiro. Her e-mail address is denise@coppead.ufrj.br.

Agnes Hofmeister is dean of the faculty of business administration at Corvinus University in Budapest. Her e-mail address is agnes.hofmeister@uni-corvinus.hu.

Abstract

This study examines the relationships between negotiators' attitudes toward competitive and unethical tactics, their actual use of those tactics, and their subsequent perceptions of performance and reputation in two-party, e-mail-based negotiations. The results indicate several predictors of competitive-unethical behavior, including a negotiator's attitude toward competitive-unethical tactics, early use of competitive-unethical tactics, and the behavior of a negotiating counterpart. Furthermore, it was the perceived honesty of one's counterpart rather than the actual use of competitive-unethical behaviors that was associated with a negotiator's perceptions of the collective or joint outcome. The implications of these findings are discussed, along with suggestions for future research.

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