The impact of water conservation and intensification technologies: empirical evidence for rice farmers in Ghana

Authors

  • Liane Faltermeier,

    1. Department of Food Economics and Consumption Studies, University of Kiel, Olshausenstreet 40, D-24098 Kiel, Germany
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  • Awudu Abdulai

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Economics and Consumption Studies, University of Kiel, Olshausenstreet 40, D-24098 Kiel, Germany
      *Corresponding author: Tel.: 0049-431-8804426; fax: 0049-431-8807308. E-mail address:aabdula@food-econ.uni-kiel.de (A. Abdulai).
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*Corresponding author: Tel.: 0049-431-8804426; fax: 0049-431-8807308. E-mail address:aabdula@food-econ.uni-kiel.de (A. Abdulai).

Abstract

This study employs the propensity score matching model to examine the impact of the adoption of water conservation and intensification technologies on farm output and income among small-scale lowland rice farmers in the Northern Region of Ghana. The matching was conducted based on the Mahalanobis distance combined with the propensity score. Balancing tests by checking the mean standardized absolute bias in the matched sample were conducted as well as a sensitivity analysis was conducted to check for hidden bias due to unobservable selection. The empirical results show a positive and significant impact of the adoption of bunds technology on input demand as well as a positive but insignificant impact on output supply and net returns. Adopters of the dibbling technology were found to have higher output supply, whereas no statistically significant difference was found between the incomes of adopters and nonadopters of dibbling seed method. The results, however, reveal a positive and significant effect on output and net returns when the dibbling method is combined with intensified weeding. The estimates were found to be relatively insensitive to hidden bias.

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