Midgut bacterial dynamics in Aedes aegypti

Authors

  • Olle Terenius,

    1. Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jenny M. Lindh,

    1. Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Karolina Eriksson-Gonzales,

    1. Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Luc Bussière,

    1. Biological and Environmental Sciences, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ane T. Laugen,

    1. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Helen Bergquist,

    1. Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kehmia Titanji,

    1. Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ingrid Faye

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence: Ingrid Faye, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Tel.: +46 8 16 12 72; fax: +46 8 16 43 15; e-mail: Ingrid.Faye@gmt.su.se

Abstract

In vector mosquitoes, the presence of midgut bacteria may affect the ability to transmit pathogens. We have used a laboratory colony of Aedes aegypti as a model for bacterial interspecies competition and show that after a blood meal, the number of species (culturable on Luria–Bertani agar) that coexist in the midgut is low and that about 40% of the females do not harbor any cultivable bacteria. We isolated species belonging to the genera Bacillus,Elizabethkingia,Enterococcus,Klebsiella,Pantoea,Serratia, and Sphingomonas, and we also determined their growth rates, antibiotic resistance, and ex vivo inhibition of each other. To investigate the possible existence of coadaptation between midgut bacteria and their host, we fed Ae. aegypti cohorts with gut bacteria from human, a frog, and two mosquito species and followed the bacterial population growth over time. The dynamics of the different species suggests coadaptation between host and bacteria, and interestingly, we found that Pantoea stewartii isolated from Ae. aegypti survive better in Ae. aegypti as compared to P. stewartii isolated from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

Ancillary