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Keywords:

  • phage resistance;
  • tyrosine phosphatase;
  • Listeria monocytogenes

Abstract

Tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-like proteins exist in many bacteria and are segregated into two major groups: low molecular weight and conventional. The latter group also has activity as phosphoinositide phosphatases. These two kinds of PTP are suggested to be involved in many aspects of bacterial physiology including stress response, DNA binding proteins, virulence, and capsule/cell wall production. By annotation, Listeria monocytogenes possesses two potential low molecular weight and two conventional PTPs. Using L. monocytogenes wild-type (WT) strain 10403S, we have created an in-frame deletion mutant lacking all four PTPs, as well as four additional complemented strains harboring each of the PTPs. No major physiological differences were observed between the WT and the mutant lacking all four PTPs. However, the deletion mutant strain was resistant to Listeria phages A511 and P35 and sensitive to other Listeria phages. This was attributed to reduced attachment to the cell wall. The mutant lacking all PTPs was found to lack N-acetylglucosamine in its wall teichoic acid. Phage sensitivity and attachment was rescued in a complemented strain harboring a low molecular weight PTP (LMRG1707).