• Open Access

Raman tweezers provide the fingerprint of cells supporting the late stages of KSHV reactivation

Authors

  • Ossie F. Dyson,

    1. Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
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    • These authors contributed equally.

  • Patrick W. Ford,

    1. Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
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    • These authors contributed equally.

  • De Chen,

    1. Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
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  • Yong-Qing Li,

    1. Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
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  • Shaw M. Akula

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
      Correspondence to: Shaw M. AKULA, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA.
      Tel.: +(252)744-2702
      Fax: +(252) 744-3104
      E-mail: akulas@ecu.edu
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Correspondence to: Shaw M. AKULA, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA.
Tel.: +(252)744-2702
Fax: +(252) 744-3104
E-mail: akulas@ecu.edu

Abstract

Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has both latent and lytic phases of replication. The molecular switch that triggers a reactivation is still unclear. Cells from the S phase of the cell cycle provide apt conditions for an active reactivation. In order to specifically delineate the Raman spectra of cells supporting KSHV reactivation, we followed a novel approach where cells were sorted based on the state of infection (latent versus lytic) by a flow cytometer and then analysed by the Raman tweezers. The Raman bands at 785, 813, 830, 1095 and 1128 cm−1 are specifically altered in cells supporting KSHV reactivation. These five peaks make up the Raman fingerprint of cells supporting KSHV reactivation. The physiological relevance of the changes in these peaks with respect to KSHV reactivation is discussed in the following report.

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