• Open Access

Association of human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) polymorphism with development of acute lung injury

Authors

  • Anita J. Reddy,

    1. Duke University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Durham, NC, USA
    2. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jason D. Christie,

    1. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Richard Aplenc,

    1. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Barry Fuchs,

    1. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paul N. Lanken,

    1. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Steven R. Kleeberger

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence to: Steven R. KLEEBERGER, Ph.D., Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Bldg 101, Rm. D240, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.
Tel.: 919-541-3540
Fax: 919-541-4133
E-mail: kleeber1@niehs.nih.gov

Abstract

Acute lung injury (ALI) is a syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality, but its genetic susceptibility is not clearly understood. In the present study, we characterized functional promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phase II antioxidant gene NQO1 (NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1) to evaluate its role in susceptibility to ALI. Three previously uncharacterized SNPs in the NQO1 promoter were selected for investigation. Luciferase assays were performed using constructs of each promoter polymorphism to evaluate function. Functional SNPs were genotyped in a prospective cohort of major trauma patients (N= 264) and assessed for association with development of ALI. The A/C SNP at −1221 decreased in vitro transcription of NQO1 at baseline and after exposure to hyperoxia and other oxidant stressors. Patients heterozygous for the −1221 C allele were at significantly lesser risk of ALI after major trauma compared with patients with wild-type alleles, even after adjustment for APACHE III score, and mechanism of trauma [OR, 0.46 (95% CI 0.23, 0.90); P= 0.024]. This study demonstrated that the AC genotype at position −1221 in the NQO1 gene caused decreased transcription and was associated with a lower incidence of ALI following major trauma. These novel findings may have important implications in diseases with oxidant stress aetiologies.

Ancillary