Inverse relationship of baseline body temperature and outcome between ischemic stroke patients treated and not treated with thrombolysis: the Bergen stroke study

Authors


Halvor Naess, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, N-5021 Bergen, Norway
Tel.: +47 55975045
Fax: +47 55975164
e-mail: halvor.naess@haukeland.no

Abstract

Naess H, Idicula T, Lagallo N, Brogger J, Waje-Andreassen U, Thomassen L. Inverse relationship of baseline body temperature and outcome between ischemic stroke patients treated and not treated with thrombolysis: the Bergen stroke study.
Acta Neurol Scand: 2010: 122: 414–417.
© 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Munksgaard.

Background –  High body temperature may promote clot lysis whereas low body temperature is neuroprotective in patients with cerebral infarction. We hypothesized that high body temperature is associated with favorable outcome in patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and that low body temperature is associated with favorable outcome in patients not treated with tPA.

Methods –  Patients (n = 111) who were treated with tPA and patients (n = 139) who were not treated with tPA, but presented within 6 h of stroke onset were included. Patients with no temperature measurements within 6 h of stroke onset were excluded. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was obtained on admission. Modified Rankin score (mRS) was obtained after 1 week. Favorable outcome was defined as mRS 0–2 and unfavorable outcome as mRS 3–6.

Results –  On logistic regression analysis, high body temperature was independently associated with favorable outcome among patients treated with tPA (OR = 3.7, P = 0.009) and low body temperature was independently associated with favorable prognosis among patients not treated with tPA (OR = 2.0, P = 0.042).

Conclusions –  Our study suggests that the effect of high body temperature on clot lysis is more important than the neuroprotective effect of low body temperature in the early phase after cerebral infarction treated with tPA.

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