Visual field defects in prematurely born patients with white matter damage of immaturity: a multiple-case study

Authors

  • Lena Jacobson,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Paediatric Neurology, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
      Lene Martin
      Department of Clinical Neuroscience
      Ophthalmology and Vision
      Karolinska Institute
      St Erik's Eye Hospital
      S-112 82 Stockholm
      Sweden
      Tel: + 46 8 672 3668
      Fax: + 46 8 672 3330
      Email: lene.martin@ste.ki.se
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  • Olof Flodmark,

    1. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Department of Neuroradiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Lene Martin

    1. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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Lene Martin
Department of Clinical Neuroscience
Ophthalmology and Vision
Karolinska Institute
St Erik's Eye Hospital
S-112 82 Stockholm
Sweden
Tel: + 46 8 672 3668
Fax: + 46 8 672 3330
Email: lene.martin@ste.ki.se

Abstract.

Purpose:  White matter damage of immaturity may affect visual, motor and cognitive functions. This multiple-case study presents standardized perimetry results in six teenagers and young adults born prematurely with visual dysfunction due to white matter damage of immaturity of pre- or perinatal origin.

Methods:  Six subjects, aged 13–25 years, born at a gestational age of 28–34 weeks, with white matter damage of immaturity documented by MRI, and optic disc appearances documented by fundus photography, were examined with manual and computerized quantitative perimetry.

Results:  All subjects had subnormal visual field (VF) function, although the depth and extension of the VF defects differed between subjects. The inferior VF function was more deviant than the superior in all cases. The concordance between the VF defects detected with the different techniques was good, although the static computerized techniques revealed slightly more abnormality.

Conclusion:  White matter damage of immaturity may affect the VF. The lower VF is often more affected than the upper. The abnormalities can be demonstrated by both manual and computerized perimetry.

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