AUDITORY THRESHOLDS AND THE EFEECT OF REDUCED AUDITORY FEEDBACK ON STUTTERING

Authors

  • T. Brown,

    1. Department of Psychiatry (Head: Professor A. Munro), University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England
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  • J. E. Sambrooks,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry (Head: Professor A. Munro), University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England
      Jean E. Sambrooks, M.Sc Department of Psychiatry The University of Liverpool 6 Abercromby Square P. O. Box 147 Liverpool L69 3BX England
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  • M. J. MacCulloch

    1. Department of Psychiatry (Head: Professor A. Munro), University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England
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Jean E. Sambrooks, M.Sc Department of Psychiatry The University of Liverpool 6 Abercromby Square P. O. Box 147 Liverpool L69 3BX England

Abstract

The effects of reduced auditory feedback were investigated using an accurately calibrated binaudal pure tone producer on 27 stuttering children and 68 non-stuttering controls.

A comparison was made of both auditory hearing and discomfort thresholds in the two groups; the hearing thresholds did not differ between the groups. The results did however replicate an earlier finding which suggested that stutterers have a lower threshold for auditory discomfort than do normal speakers, and showed that fluency is inversely related to auditory feedback.

The discussion suggests that a necessary cause of stuttering is a physiological abnormality in side-tone conduction and central processing.

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