A housing support programme for the mentally ill: need profile and satisfaction among users

Authors

  • T. Middelboe,

    Corresponding author
    1. Social Psychiatry Research Unit, Bispeblerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
    2. Department of Psychiatry E, Community Mental Health Centre, Bispeblerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • T. Mackeprang,

    1. Social Psychiatry Research Unit, Bispeblerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
    2. Department of Psychiatry E, Community Mental Health Centre, Bispeblerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • A. Thalsgaard,

    1. Department of Psychiatry E, Community Mental Health Centre, Bispeblerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • P. B. Christiansen

    1. Department of Psychiatry E, Community Mental Health Centre, Bispeblerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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Thomas Middelboe, Gentofte University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry A, DK-2900 Hellerup, Denmark

Abstract

Housing support has become an integrated part of the community psychiatric service during the past years. In this study, the need profile, satisfaction rates and clinical characteristics of the users of a housing support programme in Copenhagen are described. Among the 45 residents interviewed, schizophrenia was by far the dominant diagnosis. The Camberwell Assessment of Needs procedure revealed a total of 8.3 needs, including 3.4 unmet needs per resident, within the 22 need areas investigated. The needs were most prevalent within the areas of psychological and social functioning. Agreement between residents and staff on the presence of needs was generally low. Satisfaction rates were moderate to high, and a substantial proportion of the residents reported their general quality of life to be improved during participation in the programme. The type of support provided seemed to fit important need areas, suggesting that the programme is appropriate.

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