Cognitive-behavioral group therapy for obsessive–compulsive disorder: a 1-year follow-up

Authors

  • D. T. Braga,

    1. Anxiety Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • A. V. Cordioli,

    1. Anxiety Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • K. Niederauer,

    1. Anxiety Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • G. G. Manfro

    1. Anxiety Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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A. V. Cordioli, Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Rua: Ramiro Barcelos, 2350, Room 400N, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS–Brazil.
E-mail: acordioli@terra.com.br

Abstract

Objective:  The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) over a 1-year follow-up period.

Method:  Forty-two OCD patients, who completed 12 sessions of CBGT, were followed for 1 year. Measures of the severity of symptoms were obtained at the end of the acute treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment using the Yale-Brown obsessive–compulsive scale (Y-BOCS) and the clinical global impression (CGI).

Results:  The reduction in the severity of symptoms observed at the end of the treatment was maintained during 1 year (F2,41 = 1.1; P = 0.342). Eleven patients (35.5%) relapsed in the follow-up period. The intensity of improvement (log rank = 12.97, GL = 1, P = 0.0003) and full remission (log rank = 6.17; GL = 1; P = 0.001) were strong predictors for non-relapsing.

Conclusion:  The CBGT is an effective treatment for OCD and its results are maintained for 1 year. However, further long-term randomized controlled trials are needed in order to confirm this finding.

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