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Major psychoses with mixed psychotic and mood symptoms: are mixed psychoses associated with different neurobiological markers?

Authors

  • E. Bora,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, The University of Melbourne
    2. Melbourne Health
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  • M. Yucel,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, The University of Melbourne
    2. Melbourne Health
    3. Department of Psychiatry, ORYGEN Research Centre, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne
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  • A. Fornito,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, The University of Melbourne
    2. Melbourne Health
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  • M. Berk,

    1. Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong
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  • C. Pantelis

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, The University of Melbourne
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Sunshine Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia
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Emre Bora, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Melbourne, Alan Gilbert Building NNF Level 3, Carlton, Vic. 3053, Australia.
E-mail: boremre@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective:  Evidence related to overlapping clinical and genetic risk factors in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) have raised concerns about the validity of ‘Kraepelinian dichotomy’. As controversies mainly arise in mixed psychoses that occupy the intermediate zone between schizophrenia and BD, investigating neurobiological markers of mixed psychoses may be relevant to understanding the nature of psychotic disorders.

Method:  In this article, we review studies comparing magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and electrophysiological findings in mixed psychoses with each other, as well as with more prototypical cases of schizophrenia and BD.

Results:  The evidence reviewed suggests that mixed psychoses may be associated with different genetic and neurobiological markers compared with prototypical forms of schizophrenia and BD.

Conclusion:  These findings may be compatible with more sophisticated versions of dimensional and continuum models or, alternatively, they may suggest that there is an intermediate third category between prototypical schizophrenia and BD.

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