Get access

Preterm birth or foetal growth impairment and psychiatric hospitalization in adolescence and early adulthood in a Swedish population-based birth cohort

Authors

  • W. Monfils Gustafsson,

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. Josefsson,

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. Ekholm Selling,

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. Sydsjö

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author

Dr Gunilla Sydsjö, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
E-mail: gunilla.sydsjo@lio.se

Abstract

Objective:  Preterm birth and restricted foetal growth are related to symptoms of psychiatric disorder. Our aim was therefore to investigate possible relations between being born preterm and/or small for gestational age (SGA) and later psychiatric hospitalization.

Method:  A population-based registry study of psychiatric hospitalization of in total 155 994 boys and 148 281 girls born in Sweden in 1973–1975.

Results:  The risk of hospitalization for all mental disorders was increased for preterm SGA boys (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.49–3.21); at-term SGA boys (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.34–1.79); at-term SGA girls (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15–1.50). At-term SGA boys and girls suffered increased risk of anxiety and adjustment disorders (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.18–2.45 and OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.14–1.94). Preterm SGA boys were at risk of personality disorders (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.16–9.41) and psychotic disorders (OR 4.36, 95% CI 1.85–10.30).

Conclusion:  The results show a relationship between being born SGA and later psychiatric hospitalization, where preterm birth and male gender seem to increase the risk.

Ancillary