Morphology of the corpus callosum in treatment-resistant schizophrenia and major depression

Authors

  • J. Sun,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China
    2. Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • J. J. Maller,

    1. Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Z. J. Daskalakis,

    1. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • C. C. Furtado,

    1. Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • P. B. Fitzgerald

    1. Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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Paul B Fitzgerald, MBBS, MPM, PhD, FRANZCP, The Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Level One, Old Baker Building, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Prahran, 3181 Victoria, Australia.
E-mail: p.fitzgerald@alfred.org.au; paul.fitzgerald@med.monash.edu.au

Abstract

Objective:  To identify possible differences in the mean midsagittal corpus callosum (CC) total and subdivision areas in treatment-resistant schizophrenia and depression (TRS and TRD) patients.

Method:  Areas of the total CC and its five equidistant subregions (from CC1 to CC5) obtained by parallel grid partitioning schemes were manually segmented from brain MRI of 42 TRS, 45 TRD patients and 30 healthy controls. The intracranial volume (ICV) normalized areas were calculated and compared between groups.

Results:  When compared with controls, patients with TRS had reduced ICV and a larger CC5, and TRD patients had a smaller CC4 while no significant difference in CC total area in patients with TRS or TRD was found. Multiple individual segments and total CC areas were significantly larger in TRS than TRD patients after normalization.

Conclusion:  Patients with TRS and TRD have different CC morphological characteristics, and therefore there may be aberrant interhemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder patients.

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