Perceived parental rearing in subjects with obsessive–compulsive disorder and their siblings

Authors


Leonhard Lennertz, Dipl.-Psych., Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, DE-53105 Bonn, Germany.
E-mail: leonard.lennertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de

Abstract

Lennertz L, Grabe HJ, Ruhrmann S, Rampacher F, Vogeley A, Schulze-Rauschenbach S, Ettelt S, Meyer K, Kraft S, Reck C, Pukrop R, John U, Freyberger HJ, Klosterkötter J, Maier W, Falkai P, Wagner M. Perceived parental rearing in subjects with obsessive–compulsive disorder and their siblings.

Objective:  Perceived parenting in patients suffering from obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is examined. We attempted to overcome some methodological limitations of prior studies by taking age of onset, parental OCD and comorbid depression into consideration. In addition, we included data from unaffected siblings to corroborate information on parental rearing.

Method:  One hundred and twenty-two cases with OCD and 41 of their siblings as well as 59 healthy controls and 45 of their siblings completed the German short-version of the EMBU (FEE).

Results:  Obsessive–compulsive disorder cases reported less parental warmth and more parental rejection and control. Further analyses indicated that parenting is also associated with OCD in cases with late onset and cases without parents affected by OCD. OCD cases with comorbid depression described their parents particularly negatively. Data from siblings indicated good validity of perceived parenting in OCD.

Conclusion:  This study provides further evidence for dysfunctional child rearing being relevant to the development of OCD and depression.

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