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Seasonal allergies and suicidality: results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

Authors


  • Correction added after online publication 7 May 2010: D.E. Clark was corrected to D.E. Clarke in the HTML version of the article.

Erick Messias, Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of Georgia, 997 St Sebastian Way, Augusta, GA 30912, USA.
E-mail: emessias@gmail.com

Abstract

Messias E, Clarke DE, Goodwin RD. Seasonal allergies and suicidality: results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.

Objective:  Studies have shown an association between allergies and suicidality, and a seasonality of suicide has also been described. We hypothesize an association between history of seasonal allergies and suicide ideation and attempt.

Method:  Data came from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative sample (n = 5692) of adults living in the US. Logistic regression models were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (OR) controlling for the following: age, sex, race, smoking, asthma and depression.

Results:  After weighting and adjustment, a positive and statistically significant association was found between history of seasonal allergies and history of suicidal ideation [adjusted OR = 1.27 (1.01–1.58)]. We found no association between history of seasonal allergies and history of suicide attempts [adjusted OR = 1.17 (0.89–1.52)].

Conclusion:  Findings from a population-based sample support the hypothesized relationship between allergies and suicidal ideation.

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