Evaluating depressive symptoms and their impact on outcome in schizophrenia applying the Calgary Depression Scale

Authors


Rebecca Schennach-Wolff, Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Nussbaumstr. 7, 80336 München, Germany.
E-mail: Rebecca.Schennach-Wolff@med.uni-muenchen.de

Abstract

Schennach-Wolff R, Obermeier M, Seemüller F, Jäger M, Messer T, Laux G, Pfeiffer H, Naber D, Schmidt LG, Gaebel W, Klosterkötter J, Heuser I, Maier W, Lemke MR, Rüther E, Klingberg S, Gastpar M, Möller H-J, Riedel M. Evaluating depressive symptoms and their impact on outcome in schizophrenia applying the Calgary Depression Scale.

Objective:  To examine depressive symptoms, their course during treatment, and influence on outcome.

Method:  Weekly Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia ratings were performed in 249 inpatients with schizophrenia. Early response was defined as a 20% reduction in the total score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia from admission to week 2, response as a 50% reduction in the total score of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia (PANSS) from admission to discharge and remission according to the consensus criteria.

Results:  Thirty six per cent of the patients were depressed at admission, with 23% of them still being depressed at discharge. Depressed patients scored significantly higher on the PANSS negative and general psychopathology subscore, featured more impairments in subjective well-being (P < 0.0001) and functioning (P < 0.0001). They suffered from more suicidality (P = 0.0021), and had greater insight into their illness (P = 0.0105). No significant differences were found regarding early response, response, and remission.

Conclusion:  Patients with depressive symptoms should be monitored closely, given the burden of negative symptoms, their impairments in well-being and functioning and the threat of suicidality.

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