Patient characteristics and symptoms associated with perceived coercion during hospital treatment

Authors


Andrea Fiorillo, Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 80138 Naples, Italy.
E-mail: andrea.fiorillo@unina2.it

Abstract

Fiorillo A, Giacco D, De Rosa C, Kallert T, Katsakou C, Onchev G, Raboch J, Mastrogianni A, Del Vecchio V, Luciano M, Catapano F, Dembinskas A, Nawka P, Kiejna A, Torres-Gonzales F, Kjellin L, Maj M, Priebe S. Patient characteristics and symptoms associated with perceived coercion during hospital treatment.

Objective:  Large numbers of psychiatric patients either are involuntarily admitted to hospital treatment or feel coerced despite a legally voluntary admission. For ethical and clinical reasons, their perceived coercion should be reduced as far as possible. There is however limited evidence on patient characteristics associated with perceived coercion during hospital treatment. This study aimed to identify i) sociodemographic and clinical characteristics associated with perceived coercion at admission and ii) changes in symptoms and global functioning associated with changes in perceived coercion over time.

Method:  Three thousand and ninety three in-patients who were involuntarily admitted or felt coerced to hospital treatment despite a legally voluntary admission were recruited in the European evaluation of coercion in psychiatry and harmonization of best clinical practice – EUNOMIA project in 11 European countries. Perceived coercion, global functioning and symptoms were assessed after admission and at a 3-month follow-up.

Results:  Involuntary admission, female gender, poorer global functioning and more positive symptoms were associated with higher levels of perceived coercion at admission. Perceived coercion significantly decreased over time, and the improvements in global functioning and positive symptoms were associated with reduction in perceived coercion.

Conclusion:  Female patients perceive more coercion in psychiatric hospital treatment. Effective treatment for positive symptoms and improving patients’ global functioning may lead to a reduction in perceived coercion.

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