Manipulation of hunger levels affects great spotted cuckoo and magpie host nestlings differently

Authors

  • David Martín-Gálvez,

    1. Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain.
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  • Liesbeth De Neve,

    1. Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain.
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  • Tomás Pérez-Contreras,

    1. Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain.
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  • Manuel Soler,

    1. Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain.
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  • Juan Gabriel Martínez,

    1. Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain.
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  • Juan José Soler

    1. Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain.
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D. Martín-Gálvez, Depto de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas – CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, ES-04120 Almería, Spain. E-mail: dmartin@eeza.csic.es

Abstract

Brood parasitic nestlings usually exhibit an exaggerated begging behaviour, which is mainly attributed to reduced inclusive fitness costs since they typically share the nest with unrelated individuals. However, energetic costs also constrain begging expression and accordingly a relation between food requirements and intensity of begging behaviour could also exist in brood parasites, just as in nesting bird species. Here, we tested this hypothesis in the great spotted cuckoo Clamator glandarius and its main host, the magpie Pica pica, by studying the effect of an appetite enhancer, cyproheptadine hydrochloride, on nestling provisioning and development (size, body mass and cell-mediated immune response). To study nestling provisioning, neck-collars were meticulously placed around nestling necks allowing normal respiration but avoiding the ingestion of food delivered by adult magpies during ca 2.5 h. Loss in body mass during neck-collar trials was used as a proxy for energetic begging costs, while the amount of food received during these trials and growth during the whole nestling period were used as variables reflecting short- and long-term effects of the experimental treatment. During neck-collar trials, we found that experimental nestlings of both species received more food than control nestlings. However, experimental magpies, but not cuckoos, lost more body mass than control nestlings. These results suggest a short-term beneficial effect of an escalated begging behaviour in both species that would be energetically cheaper for cuckoos than for magpies. We found positive long-term effects of the appetite enhancer only in magpies (in terms of tarsus and wing length at fledging, but not in terms of immune response and body mass); suggesting that exaggerated begging would be beneficial for hosts only. We discuss the possible effect of begging behaviour on the risk of predation and on inclusive fitness, but also the possibility that our results may be explained by some kind of limitation in the capability of food assimilation by parasitic species.

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