Clinical Oral Implants Research

Evaluation of functional dynamics during osseointegration and regeneration associated with oral implants

Authors

  • Po-Chun Chang,

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    3. Department of Preventive Dentistry, Division of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Niklaus P. Lang,

    1. Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China SAR
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  • William V. Giannobile

    1. Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    3. Michigan Center for Oral Health Research, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
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Correspondence to:
William Giannobile
University of Michigan
School of Dentistry
Michigan Center for Oral Health Research
1011 N. University Ave.
Rm. 3305 Dental Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Tel.: +1 734 764 1562
Fax: +1 734 763-5503
e-mail: wgiannob@umich.edu

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this paper is to review current investigations on functional assessments of osseointegration and assess correlations to the peri-implant structure.

Material and methods: The literature was electronically searched for studies of promoting dental implant osseointegration, functional assessments of implant stability, and finite element (FE) analyses in the field of implant dentistry, and any references regarding biological events during osseointegration were also cited as background information.

Results: Osseointegration involves a cascade of protein and cell apposition, vascular invasion, de novo bone formation and maturation to achieve the primary and secondary dental implant stability. This process may be accelerated by alteration of the implant surface roughness, developing a biomimetric interface, or local delivery of growth-promoting factors. The current available pre-clinical and clinical biomechanical assessments demonstrated a variety of correlations to the peri-implant structural parameters, and functionally integrated peri-implant structure through FE optimization can offer strong correlation to the interfacial biomechanics.

Conclusions: The progression of osseointegration may be accelerated by alteration of the implant interface as well as growth factor applications, and functional integration of peri-implant structure may be feasible to predict the implant function during osseointegration. More research in this field is still needed.

To cite this article:
Chang P-C, Lang NP, Giannobile WV. Evaluation of functional dynamics during osseointegration and regeneration associated with oral implants.
Clin. Oral Impl. Res. 21, 2010; 1–12.

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