Response of human bone marrow stromal cells, MG-63, and SaOS-2 to titanium-based dental implant surfaces with different topography and surface energy

Authors

  • Ute Hempel,

    Corresponding author
    • Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Technology, Dresden, Germany
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    • UH (in vitro-experiments) and TH (surface preparation and characterization) equally contribute to the presented study.
  • Thomas Hefti,

    1. Thommen Medical AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    2. Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
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    • UH (in vitro-experiments) and TH (surface preparation and characterization) equally contribute to the presented study.
  • Peter Dieter,

    1. Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Technology, Dresden, Germany
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  • Falko Schlottig

    1. Thommen Medical AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
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Corresponding author:

Dr Ute Hempel,

Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Fiedlerstraße 42, D-01307 Dresden, Germany

Tel.: +49 351 458 6430

Fax: +49 351 458 6317

e-mail: ute.hempel@tu-dresden.de

Abstract

Objectives

Osseointegration is dependent on different parameters of the implant surface like surface roughness and physicochemical properties. In vitro studies using a wide variety of surface parameters and cell lines make it difficult to address the influence of a single parameter. With this study the influence of surface topography and energy on different osteoblast derived cell lines, namely MG-63 and SaOS-2 and of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) were investigated.

Material and methods

Cells were cultured on polished (POL) and sandblasted/hot acid etched (SBA) titanium surfaces which were partly alkaline treated (SBA NaOH). Cell morphology, metabolic activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) formation were determined.

Results

Impaired spreading was found on both SBA surfaces. Proliferation after 4 and 7 days increased on POL compared to both SBA surfaces. TNAP activity of hMSC and MG-63 was increased on POL compared to both SBA surfaces whereas SaOS-2 did not discriminate between the three surfaces. PGE2 formation of hMSC and MG-63 was on both SBA surfaces after 2 days significantly higher than on POL.

Conclusions

The results of this study show that surface roughness has a distinct influence on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. However, variations in physicochemical properties seem to have little influence under the used experimental conditions. It is suggested that more sever and long-lasting modifications of surface chemistry would have an influence on osteoblastic cells.

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