Calibration of self-reported oral health to clinically determined standards

Authors


  • This research was supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) grant R03DE018767.

Honghu Liu, Division of Public Health & Community Dentistry,
UCLA School of Dentistry,
10833 Le Conte Avenue,
Room 63-037A CHS,
Box 951668,
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1668, USA
Tel.: (310) 794-0700
Fax: (310) 206-2688
e-mail: hhliu@ucla.edu

Abstract

Liu H, Maida CA, Spolsky VW, Shen J, Li H, Zhou X, Marcus M. Calibration of self-reported oral health to clinically determined standards. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2010; 38: 527–539. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S

Abstract – Objective:  Self-report of oral health is an inexpensive approach to assessing an individual’s oral health status, but it is heavily influenced by personal views and usually differs from that of clinically determined oral health status. To assist researchers and clinicians in estimating oral health self-report, we summarize clinically determined oral health measures that can objectively measure oral health and evaluate the discrepancies between self-reported and clinically determined oral health status. We test hypotheses of trends across covariates, thereby creating optimal calibration models and tools that can adjust self-reported oral health to clinically determined standards.

Methods:  Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, we examined the discrepancy between self-reported and clinically determined oral health. We evaluated the relationship between the degree of this discrepancy and possible factors contributing to this discrepancy, such as patient characteristics and general health condition. We used a regression approach to develop calibration models for self-reported oral health.

Results:  The relationship between self-reported and clinically determined oral health is complex. Generally, there is a discrepancy between the two that can best be calibrated by a model that includes general health condition, number of times a person has received health care, gender, age, education, and income.

Conclusion:  The model we developed can be used to calibrate and adjust self-reported oral health status to that of clinically determined standards and for oral health screening of large populations in federal, state, and local programs, enabling great savings in resources used in dental care.

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