Experimentally-induced irritant contact dermatitis

Determination of optimum irritant concentrations

Authors

  • Carolyn M. Willis,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dermatology, Wycombe General Hospital, High Wycombe, Bucks, HP11 2TT, UK
    • C.M.Willis, Department of Dermatology, Wycombe General Hospital, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, HPII 2TT, England

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  • Catherine J. M. Stephens,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Wycombe General Hospital, High Wycombe, Bucks, HP11 2TT, UK
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  • J. D. Wilkinson

    1. Department of Dermatology, Wycombe General Hospital, High Wycombe, Bucks, HP11 2TT, UK
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Abstract

Patch testing with 7 irritants has been performed on a panel of 42 health volunteers, with the aim of determining concentrations which would induce mild to moderate reactions in at least 75% of individuals tested. The irritants studied and their optimum concentrations were as follows: benzalkonium chloride, 0.5%; sodium lauryl sulphate, 5%; croton oil, 0.8%; dithranol, 0.02%; nonanoic acid, 80%; propylene glycol, 100%; sodium hydroxide, 2%. Responder rates lower than 75% had to be accepted for benzalkonium chloride and sodium hydroxide in order to prevent overly severe reactions, whilst propylene glycol proved to have only marginal irritant properties.

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