A case of contact dermatitis due to impurities of cetyl alcohol

Authors

  • Hiromi Kscomamura,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, 2–2, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565, Japan
    • Hiromi Komamura, Department of Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, 2–2, Yamadaoka, Suita-Shi, Osaka 565, Japan

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  • Toshiaki Dor,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, 2–2, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565, Japan
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  • Shigeki Inui,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, 2–2, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565, Japan
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  • Kunihiko Yoshikawa

    1. Department of Dermatology, Osaka University School of Medicine, 2–2, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565, Japan
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Abstract

A 29-year-old man being treated for itchy lesions on the amputation stump of the thigh became allergic to betamethasone valerate and gentamicin sulfate cream (Rinderon VG®. Closed patch tests with all the ingredients of the cream revealed positive reactions to cetyl alcohol 30% to 5% pet. Gas chromatographic analysis of the cetyl alcohol in the cream base detected stearyl alcohol (C18), myristyl alcohol (C14) and lauryl alcohol (C12) in addition to the main component of cetyl alcohol (C16). Patch testing with 99% pure analytical reagent grade saturated alcohols. (C10, C11, C12, C13, C14, C15, C16, C17, C18, C19, C20) showed negative reactions. Thus, it is concluded that some minor impurities in cetyl alcohol not detected by gas chromatography might be the cause of this dermatitis.

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