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UNICOR: a species connectivity and corridor network simulator

Authors

  • E. L. Landguth,

    1. Univ. of Montana, Div. of Biological Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Present address of JG: Lupine Logic Inc., Missoula, MT 59802, USA
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  • B. K. Hand,

    1. Univ. of Montana, Div. of Biological Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Present address of JG: Lupine Logic Inc., Missoula, MT 59802, USA
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  • J. Glassy,

    1. Univ. of Montana, Div. of Biological Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Present address of JG: Lupine Logic Inc., Missoula, MT 59802, USA
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  • S. A. Cushman,

    1. Univ. of Montana, Div. of Biological Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Present address of JG: Lupine Logic Inc., Missoula, MT 59802, USA
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  • M. A. Sawaya

    1. Univ. of Montana, Div. of Biological Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Present address of JG: Lupine Logic Inc., Missoula, MT 59802, USA
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E. L. Landguth, Univ. of Montana, Div. of Biological Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Present address of JG: Lupine Logic Inc., Missoula, MT 59802, USA. E-mail: erin.landguth@mso.umt.edu

Abstract

We introduce UNIversal CORridor network simulator (UNICOR), a species connectivity and corridor identification tool. UNICOR applies Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to individual-based simulations. Outputs can be used to designate movement corridors, identify isolated populations, and prioritize conservation plans to promote species persistence. The key features include a driver-module framework, connectivity mapping with thresholding and buffering, and calculation of graph theory metrics. Through parallel-processing, computational efficiency is greatly improved, allowing analyses of large extents and entire populations. Previously available approaches are limited by prolonged computational times and poor algorithmic efficiency, restricting problem-size and requiring artificial subsampling of populations.

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