Janus kinases in immune cell signaling

Authors

  • Kamran Ghoreschi,

    1. Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
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  • Arian Laurence,

    1. Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
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  • John J. O’Shea

    1. Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
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Kamran Ghoreschi
Building 10 – 13C103
10 Center Dr
Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA
Tel.: +1 301 435 1852
Fax: +1 301 402 0012
e-mail: ghoreschik@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

Summary:  The Janus family kinases (Jaks), Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2, form one subgroup of the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases. They are involved in cell growth, survival, development, and differentiation of a variety of cells but are critically important for immune cells and hematopoietic cells. Data from experimental mice and clinical observations have unraveled multiple signaling events mediated by Jaks in innate and adaptive immunity. Deficiency of Jak3 or Tyk2 results in defined clinical disorders, which are also evident in mouse models. A striking phenotype associated with inactivating Jak3 mutations is severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas mutation of Tyk2 results in another primary immunodeficiency termed autosomal recessive hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome. By contrast, complete deletion of Jak1 or Jak2 in the mouse are not compatible with life and, unsurprisingly, do not have counterparts in human disease. However, activating mutations of each of the Jaks are found in association with malignant transformation, the most common being gain-of-function mutations of Jak2 in polycythemia vera and other myeloproliferative disorders. Our existing knowledge on Jak signaling pathways and fundamental work on their biochemical structure and intracellular interactions allow us to develop new strategies for controlling autoimmune diseases or malignancies by developing selective Jak inhibitors, which are now coming into clinical use. Despite the fact that Jaks were discovered only a little more than a decade ago, at the time of writing there are 20 clinical trials underway testing the safety and efficacy of Jak inhibitors.

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