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Polymerase chain reaction detection of Clostridium perfringens in feces from captive and wild chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes

Authors


Shiho Fujita, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan.
Tel.: +81 83 933 5882;
fax: +81 83 933 5882;
e-mail: fujita@yamaguchi_u.ac.jp

Abstract

Background  For veterinary management of non-human primates in captivity, and conservation of wild-living primates, management of their health risks is necessary. Incidences of pathogenic bacteria in the fecal specimens are considered as one of the useful indicators for non-invasive health monitoring.

Methods  We carried out the detection of Clostridium perfringens in feces from captive and wild chimpanzees by the rapid polymerase chain reaction method.

Results  The bacterium was detected in most fecal specimens (80%) in captive chimpanzees. Contrarily, the detection rate in the wild chimpanzees was low, with 23% (n = 12) of 53 fecal samples from the Bossou group, Guinea, and 1.2% (1/81) in the Mahale group, Tanzania.

Conclusions  These results show that the intestinal microflora differs between Pan populations under various living conditions, being influenced by their diet and environment.

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