Plant functional traits capture species richness variations along a flooding gradient

Authors

  • Cyrille Violle,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Anne Bonis,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Manuel Plantegenest,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Christophe Cudennec,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Christian Damgaard,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Benoît Marion,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Didier Le Cœur,

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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  • Jan-Bernard Bouzillé

    1. Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France
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C. Violle, Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Arizona, BioSciences West, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA and, CNRS, Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, Montpellier, France. E-mail: cyrille.violle@cefe.cnrs.fr

Abstract

Local species coexistence is the outcome of abiotic and biotic filtering processes which sort species according to their trait values. However, the capacity of trait-based approaches to predict the variation in realized species richness remains to be investigated. In this study, we asked whether a limited number of plant functional traits, related to the leaf-height-seed strategy scheme and averaged at the community level, is able to predict the variation in species richness over a flooding disturbance gradient. We further investigated how these mean community traits are able to quantify the strength of abiotic and biotic processes involved in the disturbance–productivity–diversity relationship. We thus tested the proposal that the deviation between the fundamental species richness, assessed from ecological niche-based models, and realized species richness, i.e. field-observed richness, is controlled by species interactions. Flooding regime was determined using a detailed hydrological model. A precise vegetation sampling was performed across 222 quadrats located throughout the flooding gradient. Three core functional traits were considered: specific leaf area (SLA), plant height and seed mass. Species richness showed a hump-shaped response to disturbance and productivity, but was better predicted by only two mean community traits: SLA and height. On the one hand, community SLA that increased with flooding, controlled the disturbance-diversity relationship through habitat filtering. On the other hand, species interactions, the strength of which was captured by community height values, played a strong consistent role throughout the disturbance gradient by reducing the local species richness. Our study highlights that a limited number of simple, quantitative, easily measurable functional traits can capture the variation in plant species richness at a local scale and provides a promising quantification of key community assembly mechanisms.

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