Another call for the end of invasion biology

Authors

  • Loïc Valéry,

    1. Dépt d’Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and URU Biodiversité et Gestion des Territoires, Univ. de Rennes 1, Bât 25 – Avenue du Général Leclerc, FR-35042 Rennes cedex, France.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hervé Fritz,

    1. Dépt d’Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and URU Biodiversité et Gestion des Territoires, Univ. de Rennes 1, Bât 25 – Avenue du Général Leclerc, FR-35042 Rennes cedex, France.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jean-Claude Lefeuvre

    1. Dépt d’Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and URU Biodiversité et Gestion des Territoires, Univ. de Rennes 1, Bât 25 – Avenue du Général Leclerc, FR-35042 Rennes cedex, France.
    Search for more papers by this author

L. Valéry, Dépt d’Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and URU Biodiversité et Gestion des Territoires, Univ. de Rennes 1, Bât 25 – Avenue du Général Leclerc, FR-35042 Rennes cedex, France. E-mail: lvalery@mnhn.fr

Abstract

The restriction of invasion biology to non-native species has been laid down as one founding principle of the discipline by many researchers. However, this split between native and non-native species is highly controversial. Using a phenomenological approach and a more pragmatic examination of biological invasions, the present paper discusses how this dichotomy has restricted the relevance of the field, both from theoretical and practical viewpoints. We advocate the emergence of a broader disciplinary field.

Ancillary