Salivary profile and oxidative stress in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

Authors

  • G. Livnat,

    1. Pediatric Pulmonary Unit, Meyer Children’s Hospital, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
    2. Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • L. Bentur,

    1. Pediatric Pulmonary Unit, Meyer Children’s Hospital, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
    2. Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • E. Kuzmisnsky,

    1. Pediatric Pulmonary Unit, Meyer Children’s Hospital, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
    2. Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • R. M. Nagler

    1. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Biochemistry Laboratory and Salivary Clinic, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
    2. Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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Prof R. M. Nagler, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department and Oral Biochemistry Laboratory, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa 31096, Israel. Tel: 972 77 344 2003, Fax: 972 4 654 1295, E-mail: nagler@tx.technion.ac.il

Abstract

J Oral Pathol Med (2010) 39: 16–21

Background:  Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by altered exocrine secretions; however, no comprehensive compositional profile of CF serous and mucous saliva secretions has been published.

Design:  We analyzed salivary flow rate and composition, and oxidative stress-related parameters, comparing CF patients with non-CF bronchiectasis patients and the healthy controls.

Results:  Median salivary magnesium concentration and lactate dehydrogenase activity were significantly lower in CF patients than in the healthy controls. Salivary total protein concentration was 45% higher in CF patients than in non-CF bronchiectasis patients. CF patients showed 8% lower levels of peroxidase compared with non-CF bronchiectasis. Salivary total antioxidant status, superoxide dismutase and uric acid values in the CF group were higher by 15%, 35% and 31%, respectively, than in both control groups.

Conclusions:  Cystic fibrosis patients demonstrated altered salivary profile, especially in antioxidant enzymatic and molecular activity, possibly resulting from the oral cavity’s ongoing inflammatory and oxidative process. Free radical mechanisms may be involved in CF pathogenesis.

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