SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • diabetes;
  • epidemiology;
  • gingival index;
  • periodontal diseases

Background and Objective:   Diabetes and periodontal disease have been associated in the literature. In the present study, the periodontal heath of noninsulin-dependent diabetic adults was compared with that of a general population of nondiabetic patients.

Material and Methods:  In France, 2144 adults (age: 35–65 years) were examined for life habits (tobacco, alcohol), biological diagnosis (type II diabetes, arterial hypertension), biometry (weight, size) and biochemistry. Dental and periodontal data included plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, and clinical attachment loss.

Results:  Descriptive and multifactorial analysis evidenced a more severe periodontal disease in diabetic patients. Moreover, when the plaque index was held constant, the gingival index was more elevated in diabetics. In nondiabetics, age, gender, glycemia, alcohol, and tobacco smoking were identified as significant risk factors for periodontal disease. In contrast, in diabetic subjects, only tobacco smoking was a significant risk factor.

Conclusion:  In type II diabetics, the diabetes factor is probably more significant than periodontal risk factors, age, and gender.