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Exercise capacity, daily activity, and severity of fatigue in term born young adults after neonatal respiratory failure

Authors

  • M. H. M. van der Cammen-van Zijp,

    Corresponding author
    1. Intensive Care and Department of Pediatric Surgery, and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
    • Corresponding author: Monique H. M. van der Cammen-van Zijp, PhD, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, Room Sk 0327; Dr. Molewaterplein 60; 3015 GJ Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Tel: 31 10 7036764, Fax: 31 10 7036288, E-mail: m.vandercammen@erasmusmc.nl

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  • M. Spoel,

    1. Intensive Care and Department of Pediatric Surgery, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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  • R. Laas,

    1. Intensive Care and Department of Pediatric Surgery, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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  • W. C. J. Hop,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, ErasmusMC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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  • J. C. de Jongste,

    1. Department of Pediatrics – Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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  • D. Tibboel,

    1. Intensive Care and Department of Pediatric Surgery, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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  • R. J. G. van den Berg-Emons,

    1. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, ErasmusMC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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  • H. IJsselstijn

    1. Intensive Care and Department of Pediatric Surgery, ErasmusMC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
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Abstract

Little is known about long-term effects of neonatal intensive care on exercise capacity, physical activity, and fatigue in term borns. We determined these outcomes in 57 young adults, treated for neonatal respiratory failure; 27 of them had congenital diaphragmatic hernia with lung hypoplasia (group 1) and 30 had normal lung development (group 2). Patients in group 2 were age-matched, with similar gestational age and birth weight, and similar neonatal intensive care treatment as patients in group 1. All patients were born before the era of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide administration, and high frequency ventilation. Exercise capacity was measured by cycle ergometry, daily physical activity with an accelerometry-based activity monitor, and fatigue by the fatigue severity scale. Median (range) VO 2peak in mL/kg/min was 35.4 (19.6–55.0) in group 1 and 37.6 (15.7–52.7) in group 2. There was a between-group P-value of 0.65 for exercise capacity. Daily activity and fatigue were also similar in both groups. So, residual lung hypoplasia did not play an important role in this cohort. There were no significant associations between exercise capacity and perinatal characteristics. Future studies need to elucidate whether exercise capacity is impaired in patients with more severe lung hypoplasia who nowadays survive.

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