Migration Cues Induce Chromatin Alterations

Authors

  • Gabi Gerlitz,

    1. The Department of Molecular Genetics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
    2. Protein Section, Laboratory of Metabolism, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
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  • Idit Livnat,

    1. The Department of Molecular Genetics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Carmit Ziv,

    1. The Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, The Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Oded Yarden,

    1. The Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, The Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Michael Bustin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Protein Section, Laboratory of Metabolism, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
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  • Orly Reiner

    Corresponding author
    1. The Department of Molecular Genetics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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Orly Reiner, orly.reiner@weizmann.ac.il or Michael Bustin, bustin@helix.nih.gov

Abstract

Directed cell migration is a property central to multiple basic biological processes. Here, we show that directed cell migration is associated with global changes in the chromatin fiber. Polarized posttranslational changes in histone H1 along with a transient decrease in H1 mobility were detected in cells facing the scratch in a wound healing assay. In parallel to the changes in H1, the levels of the heterochromatin marker histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation were elevated. Interestingly, reduction of the chromatin-binding affinity of H1 altered the cell migration rates. Moreover, migration-associated changes in histone H1 were observed during nuclear motility in the simple multicellular organism Neurospora crassa. Our studies suggest that dynamic reorganization of the chromatin fiber is an early event in the cellular response to migration cues.

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