Relationship Between Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Behavior of T Cell Populations in Early Pregnancy

Authors

  • Dr. SUSUMU YAMAUCHI,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Clinical Microbiology, 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Tokai University, Kanagawa, Japan
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  • YUKIHIKO SHIOTSUKA,

    1. Division of Clinical Microbiology, 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Tokai University, Kanagawa, Japan
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  • KAZUO KOBAYASHI,

    1. Division of Clinical Microbiology, 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Tokai University, Kanagawa, Japan
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  • ATSUSHI OZAWA

    1. Division of Clinical Microbiology, 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Tokai University, Kanagawa, Japan
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Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Tokai University, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-11, Japan.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Sequential observations of lymphocyte sub-populations, response to mitogens, level of plasma human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), and detection of HCG on the surface of T cells were carried out to study immunological functions in pregnant women early in the fetomaternal relationship. T cell counts determined by the standard method decreased gradually between 5 and 10 weeks of pregnancy but no decline was observed when determined by the modified methods. Minor fluctuation of B cell populations and lymphocyte response to mitogens were within the standard value. Plasma HCG in peripheral venous blood (PVB) increased markedly until 10 weeks of gestation and then declined. T cell poulation in parauterine venous blood (PUVB) was lower than that in PVB. The presence of HCG on the surface of T cells was demonstrated in maternal lymphocytes but not those of control subjects.

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