Prostaglandin E2 and Plasminogen Activators in Human Milk and Their Secretion by Milk Macrophages

Authors

  • FRANCOISE LE DEIST,

    Corresponding author
    1. INSERM-U. 132, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris and INSERM-U. 43, Hôpital de Bicêtre-le Krenlin Bicêtre
      Inserm U. 132, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75743 Paris Cedex 15, France.
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  • GENEVIEVE DE SAINT-BASILE,

    1. INSERM-U. 132, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris and INSERM-U. 43, Hôpital de Bicêtre-le Krenlin Bicêtre
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  • EDUARDO ANGELES-CANO,

    1. INSERM-U. 132, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris and INSERM-U. 43, Hôpital de Bicêtre-le Krenlin Bicêtre
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  • CLAUDE GRISCELLI

    1. INSERM-U. 132, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris and INSERM-U. 43, Hôpital de Bicêtre-le Krenlin Bicêtre
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Inserm U. 132, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75743 Paris Cedex 15, France.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Human milk was shown to contain prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and plasminogen activator (PA) at variable concentrations depending on the time of lactation after delivery. Milk PA was functionally and immunologically identical to urokinase. A follow-up study showed that the maximum PGE2 concentrations occurred during the second week while the maximum PA concentration was observed at the end of the first week of lactation. Milk macrophages cultured in vitro were able to secrete both PGE2 and PA. When cells were activated by concanavalin A (ConA) or E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PGE2 secretion increased dramatically while PA secretion did not. The ability of activated macrophages to secrete PGE2 was at its highest shortly after delivery. It then progressively decreased during lactation. The possible physiological role of PGE2 and PA on the gastrointestinal tract of breast fed infants is discussed.

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