Chymotrypsin-Galactose Treatment of Sperm With Antisperm Antibodies Results in Improved Pregnancy Rates Following in Vitro Fertilization

Authors

  • DIANE KATSOFF,

    1. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Camden, New Jersey
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  • JEROME H. CHECK MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Camden, New Jersey
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  • ANIELA BOLLENDORF,

    1. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Camden, New Jersey
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  • KELLY BENFER

    1. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Camden, New Jersey
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7447 Old York Road, Melrose Park, Pa. 19027.

Abstract

PROBLEM: To determine if chymotrypsin-galactose (CG) treatment of sperm bound with antisperm antibodies (ASA) improves pregnancy rates (PRs) following in vitro fertilization (IVF).

METHOD: Patients with >50% ASA who failed to conceive despite six intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles were included. Initially the sperm treatments were randomized with CG vs culture medium; subsequently only CG treatment was used.

RESULTS: There was a significantly lower fertilization rate in those patients inseminated with sperm incubated in culture medium vs CG (27% vs 47%, P<.05 t-test). Similarly, a higher percentage of patients receiving culture medium treatment of sperm had failed fertilization (45%) compared to CG (11%). Though the clinical PRs were higher with CG (21%) than medium (9.5%), there was no statistical difference.

CONCLUSIONS: Though the percentage of sperm bound with antibodies are not reduced, we hypothesize that the CG treatment improves fertility by possibly mitigating the antagonistic action of these antibodies.

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