Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity and Paternal Lymphocyte Immunization in Women with Recurrent Spontaneous Abortions

Authors

  • Joanne Y.H. Kwak M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
      FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064.
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  • Alice Gilman-Sachs,

    1. FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
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  • Michael Moretti,

    1. St. Vincent's Medical Centers of Richmond, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 355 Bard Avenue, Staten Island, New York 10310-1669
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  • Kenneth D. Beaman,

    1. FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
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  • Alan E. Beer

    1. FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
    2. FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, Illinois 60064
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FUHS/The Chicago Medical School, Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064.

Abstract

PROBLEM: Natural killer (NK)-cell cytotoxicity in women undergoing lymphocyte immunization prior to and following treatment was investigated.

METHOD OF STUDY: A cohort of 33 women with a history of two or more recurrent spontaneous abortions was prospectively studied. NK-cell cytotoxicity was determined at effector-to-target ratios of 50:1 and 25:1. Peripheral blood CD56+ NK-cell, CD 19+ B-cell, CD19+/5+ B-l-cell, and CD3+ pan T-cell levels were studied by flow cytometry before and after lymphocyte immunization treatment. Maternal antipaternal T- and B-cell antibody levels were measured before and after lymphocyte immunization by flow cytometric analysis. Paternal lymphocyte immunizations were given two times with a 4-week interval. Post-lymphocyte immunization testing was done 4 weeks after the second lymphocyte immunization. The controls were 8 normal healthy women. NK assays were done twice with an interval of 8 weeks.

RESULTS: NK-cell activity at effector-to-target ratios of 50:1 (P = 0.005) and 25:1 (P = 0.001) were significantly suppressed after lymphocyte immunization. CD3+ pan T-cell levels after lymphocyte immunization were significantly increased compared with levels before lymphocyte immunization (P = 0.008). CD56+ NK-cell levels were significantly suppressed after lymphocyte immunization (P = 0.016). There was no correlation between changes in NK cytotoxicity and differences in antipaternal lymphocyte antibody levels before or after lymphocyte immunization.

CONCLUSION: Lymphocyte immunization suppresses NK-cell cytotoxicity and CD56+ NK-cell levels and increases the peripheral blood CD3+ T-cell population in women with recurrent spontaneous abortions.

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