Systemic Th1/Th2 Cytokine Responses to Paternal and Vaccination Antigens in Preeclampsia: No Differences Compared with Normal Pregnancy

Authors

  • Yvonne Jonsson,

    1. Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Division of Clinical Immunology
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  • Christina Ekerfelt,

    1. Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Division of Clinical Immunology
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  • Göran Berg,

    1. Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health and Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden
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  • Katri Nieminen,

    1. Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health and Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden
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  • Surendra Sharma,

    1. Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Brown University and Women and Infants’ Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, RI, USA
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  • Jan Ernerudh,

    1. Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Division of Clinical Immunology
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  • Leif Matthiesen

    1. Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health and Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden
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Address reprint requests to Yvonne Jonsson, Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation (AIR), Pathology building level 10, Faculty of Health and Sciences, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
E-mail: yvonne.jonsson@imk.liu.se

Abstract

Problem:  A Th1-shift has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study was designed to compare Th1/Th2 related cytokine secretion in blood between women with preeclampsia (n = 15) and normal pregnancies (n = 15), using a high-sensitivity technique for cytokine detection.

Methods of study:  Spontaneous as well as ‘fetus-specific’ and recall antigen-specific (purified protein derivate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tetanus toxoid and lipopolysaccharide) secretion of interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-12 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell assay (ELISPOT). Fetus-specific secretion was induced by stimulation with paternal PBMC in a mixed leukocyte culture assay.

Results:  All cytokines were secreted by PBMCs both from women with preeclampsia and women with normal pregnancies. No differences in the number of cytokine-secreting cells were found between the two groups.

Conclusions:  No evidence was found for a shift in the systemic Th1/Th2 responses, in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. This does, however, not exclude differences in the local immune responses related to the fetoplacental unit.

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