Endometrial Receptivity and Human Embryo Implantation

Authors

  • Najwa A. Rashid,

    1. Division of Genomics & Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore city, Singapore
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  • Sujata Lalitkumar,

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Parameswaran G. Lalitkumar,

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson

    1. Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
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Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, S-171 76, Stockholm, Sweden.
E-mail: kristina.gemzell@ki.se

Abstract

Citation Rashid NA, Lalitkumar S, Lalitkumar PG, Gemzell-Danielsson K. Endometrial Receptivity and Human Embryo Implantation. Am J Reprod Immunol 2011; 66 (Suppl. 1): 23–30

Problem  The pre-requisite of successful implantation involves an intricate cascade of molecular interactions which plays a crucial role in preparing receptive endometrium and implanting blastocyst.

Method of study  Data are hereby presented for a better understanding of endometrial receptivity in women, hoping to provide a comprehensive picture of the process and identify new areas of basic and translational research in the biology of blastocyst implantation.

Results  Timely regulation of the expression of a number of complex molecules like hormones, cytokines and growth factors, and their crosstalk from embryonic and maternal endometrial side play a major role in determining the fate of the embryo. The molecular basis of endometrial receptivity and the mechanisms by which the blastocyst first adheres to the luminal epithelium and then penetrates into the stroma are only just beginning to be resolved.

Conclusion  Advances in the development of implantation models and ‘omics’ technologies, particularly proteomics and metabolomics, are set to have a major impact on the development of this field.

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