Immune Etiology of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss and Its Diagnosis

Authors

  • Kenneth D. Beaman,

    Corresponding author
    • Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Evangelos Ntrivalas,

    1. Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Timothy M. Mallers,

    1. Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Mukesh K. Jaiswal,

    1. Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Joanne Kwak-Kim,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Alice Gilman-Sachs

    1. Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
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Correspondence

Kenneth D. Beaman, Clinical Immunology Laboratory and Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA.

E-mail: clinlab@rosalindfranklin.edu

Abstract

Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion of Immunological Origin (RSAI) is currently diagnosed by the occurrence of 2–3 consecutive miscarriages of unknown origin. The psychological trauma incurred by these events is a serious ailment which may be potentially avoided if a method of analysis is derived which may forecast these events and in turn prevent them from occurring. This review intends to examine studies of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) which use laboratory diagnosis and also studies of RSA that do not use laboratory diagnosis. We believe that when laboratory results are incorporated into the diagnosis of RSA/RSAI that treatment is highly successful whereas the absence of laboratory results severely hinders the effectiveness of treatment. It is worth noting that correlating treatment versus outcome is imprudent because of the multiple variables involved in patient cases. It is not imprudent, however, to say that incorporation of laboratory data is essential when diagnosing RSA/RSAI.

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