Donor Age-Specific Injury and Immune Responses

Authors

  • R. Oberhuber,

    1. Division of Transplant Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Visceral, Transplant and Thoracic Surgery, Center of Operative Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria
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    • These authors have contributed equally to the work.

  • X. Ge,

    1. Division of Transplant Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Anesthesiology, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA
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    • These authors have contributed equally to the work.

  • S. G. Tullius

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Transplant Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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Corresponding author: Stefan G. Tullius, stullius@partners.org

Abstract

Utilization rates of organs from elderly donors have shown the highest proportional increase during the last decade. Clinical reports support the concept of transplanting older organs. However, the engraftment of such organs has been linked to accelerated immune responses based on ageing changes per se and a proinflammatory environment subsequent to compromised injury and repair mechanism. We analyzed the clinical consequences of transplanting older donor organs and present mechanistic aspects correlating age, injury repair and effects on host immunoresponsiveness.

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