• Adults;
  • adult to adult;
  • full-right-full-left graft;
  • partial graft;
  • Split liver;
  • splitting technique;
  • graft sharing

Full-right-full-left split liver transplantation divides a donor liver into two grafts to be transplanted in adult-size patients. Major technical and organizational difficulties have limited its application to few single center series. We retrospectively analyzed the long-term results of the first multicenter series of this procedure with graft sharing. Between November 1998 and January 2005, 43 transplants were performed by five centers from 23 full-right-full-left in situ split liver procedures; 65% of the grafts were shared. A total of 31 (72%) patients had complications above grade II; 3 (6.9%) were retransplanted. Hospital mortality was 23% with sepsis as the main cause. Six patients died in the long term, two of them for a road accident. A total of 27 patients are alive after a median follow-up of 3200 days (2035–4256). Actuarial survival at 1 and 10 years were 72.1%, 62.6% and 65.1%, 57.9%, respectively for patients and grafts. These figures are similar to those reported for adult living donor liver transplantation by the European Registry over a similar period. Multicenter collaboration in sharing of these grafts is feasible and can help facing the organizational limits, thus increasing diffusion of full-right-full-left split liver transplantation.