Twenty-Year Survivors of Kidney Transplantation

Authors


Carol Traynor, caroltraynor@physicians.ie

Abstract

There have been few studies of patients with renal allografts functioning for more than 20 years. We sought to identify clinical factors associated with ultra long-term (>20 year) renal allograft survival and to describe the clinical features of these patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Irish Renal Transplant Database and included 1174 transplants in 1002 patients. There were 255 (21.74%) patients with graft function for 20 years or more. Multivariate analysis identified recipient age (HR 1.01, CI 1.01–1.02), gender (male HR 1.25, CI 1.08–1.45), acute rejection (HR 1.26, CI 1.09–1.45) and transplant type (living related donor vs. deceased donor) (HR 0.52, CI 0.40–0.66) as significantly associated with long-term graft loss. Median serum creatinine was 115 μmol/L. The 5-year graft survival in 20-year survivors was 74.7%. The mean age at death was 62.7 years (±10.6). The most common causes of death were cardiovascular disease and malignancy. The two major causes of graft loss were death (with function) and interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Comorbidities included skin cancer (36.1%), coronary heart disease (17.3%) and other malignancies (14.5%). This study identifies factors associated with long-term allograft survival and a high rate of morbidity and early mortality in long-term transplant recipients.

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