Sequelae of trauma to primary maxillary incisors. I. Complications in the primary dentition

Authors

  • M. K. Boorum,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen
    2. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. O. Andreasen

    1. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author

Mette Borum, Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Panum Institute, 20 Nerre AIIC, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark

Abstract

Abstract— Two hundred and eighty-seven children with a total of 545 traumatized primary upper incisors were followed using standardized procedures until the age of 10. Extraction was the only treatment offered when intervention was necessary. The immediate as well as the long-term consequences of trauma were studied on the basis of this material. Consequences in the primary dentition comprised: color changes (53%), pulp necrosis (25%), pulp canal obliteration (36%), gingival retraction (6%), permanent displacement after luxation (5–22%), pathological root resorption (1–10%) as well as disturbances in physiological root resorption (4%) and, lastly, premature tooth loss (46%). In a multivariate analysis of the development of pulp necrosis in primary teeth after trauma, the following decisive factors were found: age of the patient at the time of injury, degree of displacement of the tooth as well as the degree of loosening and presence of crown fracture. The factors found to influence development of pulp canal obliteration were: displacement of the tooth at time of injury as well as detectable physiologic root resorption at time of trauma. The presence of crown fracture seemed to decrease the risk of obliteration. The need for scientifically based treatment strategies for managing and reducing complications after trauma in the primary dentition is stressed.

Ancillary