Treatment of root surface in delayed tooth replantation: a review of literature

Authors

  • Sônia Regina Panzarini,

    1. Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
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  • Jéssica Lemos Gulinelli,

    1. Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
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  • Wilson Roberto Poi,

    1. Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
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  • Celso Koogi Sonoda,

    1. Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
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  • Denise Pedrini,

    1. Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
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  • Daniela Atili Brandini

    1. Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
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Profa. Dra. Sônia Regina Panzarini, Departamento de Cirurgia e Clínica Integrada, Disciplina de Clínica Integrada, Faculdade de Odontologia do Campus de Araçatuba, UNESP, Rua José Bonifácio 1193, CEP: 16015-050, Araçatuba, SP, Brazil
Tel.: +55 18 3636 3240
Fax: +55 18 3636 3332
e-mail: panzarin@foa.unesp.br

Abstract

Abstract –  The time elapsed between a trauma and tooth replantation usually ranges from 1 to 4 h. The chances of root surface damage are higher when tooth replantation is not performed immediately or if the avulsed tooth is not stored in an adequate medium. This invariably leads to necrosis of pulp tissue, periodontal ligament cells and cementum, thus increasing the possibility of root resorption, which is the main cause of loss of replanted teeth. This paper presents a comprehensive review of literature on root surface treatments performed in cases of delayed tooth replantation with necrotic cemental periodontal ligament. Journal articles retrieved from PubMed/MedLine, Bireme and Scielo databases were reviewed. It was observed that, when there are no periodontal ligament remnants and contamination is under control, replacement resorption and ankylosis are the best results and that, although these events will end up leading to tooth loss, this will happen slowly with no loss of the alveolar ridge height, which is important for future prosthesis planning.

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