Biologic treatments for systemic rheumatic diseases

Authors

  • Y Shirota,

    1. Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic, Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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  • GG Illei,

    1. Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic, Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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  • NP Nikolov

    1. Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic, Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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NP Nikolov, Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic, MPTB, NIDCR, NIH, Building 10, Room 1N-114, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Tel: (301) 402 3118, Fax: (301) 402 1228, E-mail: nikolovn@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

Many rheumatologic disorders, most notably Sjögren’s syndrome, are associated with dental complications and in some cases oral diseases may trigger or drive connective tissue disease. During the past three decades the treatment in rheumatology was revolutionized by the introduction of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases have led to the discovery of critical mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmunity and the invention of new target-specific biologic agents. In this review, we will summarize the current state of biologic therapies in rheumatology and discuss the implications of these on oral health and disease.

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