SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

FilenameFormatSizeDescription
gbb849-sup-0001-FigureS1.docWord document203K Figure S1: Normal early developmental milestones and olfaction in Nlgn4+/+,+/−,−/− pups of the Paris cohort. As in the Bethesda cohort (Fig. 2), no significant genotype differences were detected on measures of (a) body weight (+/+, N = 11–13; +/−, N = 18–24; −/−, N = 14; F2,41 = 1.30, P = 0.28), (b) latency to right up posture on all four paws (+/+, N = 11–13; +/−, N = 18–24; −/−, N = 13–14; F2,40 = 0.97, P = 0.39) and (c) latency to turn head up in the negative geotaxis test (+/+, N = 11–13; +/−, N = 18–24; −/−, N = 14; F2,40 = 0.72, P = 0.49). (d) no genotype differences were found on percentage of time spent in the compartment with the nest bedding in the home-cage odor preference test on age day 7 (+/+, N = 9; +/−, N = 22; −/−, N = 14; +/+ vs. +/+: W = 58, P = 0.68; +/+ vs. +/−: W = 98, P = 0.51).
gbb849-sup-0002-FigureS2.docWord document174K Figure S2: Juvenile reciprocal social interaction behaviors in 21-day old female Nlgn4 mice of the Bethesda cohort. Each female Nlgn4 subject mouse was paired with an unfamiliar female B6 partner for a 10-min test in a Noldus Phenotyper arena. As in males (Fig. 3), no significant genotype differences were found on measures of (a) nose-to-nose sniff (F2,25 = 0.13, NS), (b) follow (F2,25 = 0.17, NS), (c) nose-to-anogenital sniff (F2,25 = 0.33. NS) and (d) push–crawl (F2,25 = 0.63, NS). Also similar to males, bouts of (e) self-grooming (F2,25 = 0.35, NS) and (f) arena exploration (F2,25 = 2.13, NS) did not differ across genotypes. +/+, N = 7; +/−, N = 11; −/−, N = 7.
gbb849-sup-0003-FigureS3.docWord document220K Figure S3: As in males (Fig. 4), normal sociability was detected in female Nlgn4 mice tested in the automated three-chambered social approach task. (a, b) Bethesda cohort tested using the LBN method (Chamber time: +/+, F1,12 = 16.65, P < 0.01; +/−, F1,12 = 20.15, P < 0.001; −/−, F1,12 = 19.07, P < 0.001. Sniff time: +/+, F1,12 = 53.39, P < 0.001; +/−, F1,12 = 37.32, P < 0.001; −/−, F1,12 = 51.14, P < 0.001). +/+, N = 13; +/−, N = 13; −/−, N = 13. (c, d) Paris cohort tested using the Paris method (Chamber time: +/+, F1,5 = 8.01, P < 0.05; +/−, F1,23 = 71.50, P < 0.001; −/−, F1,15 = 23.76, P < 0.001. Sniff time: +/+, F1,5 = 28.25, P < 0.01; +/−, F1,24 = 70.88, P < 0.001; −/−, F1,15 = 36.17, P < 0.001). +/+, N = 6; +/−, N = 25; −/−, N = 16. (g, h) Preference for social novelty (Chamber time: +/+, F1,5 = 0.16, NS; +/−, F1,24 = 0.10, NS; −/−, F1,15 = 6.99, P < 0.05. Sniff time: +/+, F1,5 = 91.93, P < 0.001; +/−, F1,14 = 6.23, NS; −/−, F1,15 = 12.70, P < 0.05). +/+, N = 6; +/−, N = 25; −/−, N = 16. (a–d) *P < 0.05, comparison between novel mouse and novel object; (e, f)*P < 0.05, comparison between novel mouse and the empty cup; (g, h) *P < 0.05, comparison between familiar novel mouse and unfamiliar novel mouse.
gbb849-sup-0004-FigureS4.docWord document247K Figure S4: As in males (Fig. 5), no significant genotype differences were found on most measures of ultrasonic vocalizations in female Nlgn4 mice paired with B6 female resident (Paris cohort). (a) No significant differences in call rate were detected in Nlgn4+/− and Nlgn4−/−, as compared with the wild-type mice (+/+ vs. −/−: W = 28, P = 0.148; +/+ vs.+/−: W = 42, P = 0.385). (b) The difference between female +/+ and −/− was not significant on latency to first call. As compared with wild-type mice, +/− displayed shorter latency to call after the introduction of the B6 female intruder (+/+ vs. −/−: W = 30, P = 0.076; +/+ vs. +/−: W = 59, P = 0.012). (c) No significant genotype differences were found in the vocal repertoire recorded during this test. +/+, N = 4; +/−, N = 16; −/−, N = 9. *P < 0.05 vs. +/+.
gbb849-sup-0005-FigureS5.docWord document228K Figure S5: As in males (Fig. 7), normal anxiety-like behaviors were detected in female Nlgn4 mice of the Bethesda cohort. A significant effect of genotype was found on (a) percentage of time spent in the open arms (F2,30 = 9.96, P < 0.01) and (b) open arm entries (F2,30 = 4.14, P < 0.05). Post hoc comparisons indicated that female−/− had a higher percentage of open arm time as compared with the female wild-type controls (P < 0.05). Female+/− made fewer entries to the open arms as compared with wild-type females. No genotype differences were detected on measures of (c) total number of entries into open + closed arms (F2,30 = 2.62, NS). +/+, N = 10; +/, N = 12; /, N = 11. No genotype differences were detected in the light [LEFT RIGHT ARROW] dark exploration test, on measures of (d) number of transitions between compartments (F2,33 = 0.75, NS), (e) time spent in the dark chamber (F2,33 = 1.53, NS) and (f) latency to enter the dark chamber (F2,33 = 1.13, NS). +/+, N = 13; +/, N = 12; /, N = 11. *P < 0.05 vs. +/+.
gbb849-sup-0006-TableS1.docWord document75KTable S1: Summary of behavioral results of the Bethesda cohort and the Paris cohort.
gbb849-sup-0007-TableS2.docWord document27KTable S2: Summary of methodological differences in conducting the three-chambered task in Bethesda, Paris, and previous published.

Please note: Wiley Blackwell is not responsible for the content or functionality of any supporting information supplied by the authors. Any queries (other than missing content) should be directed to the corresponding author for the article.