• Open Access

The insulin-like growth factor-1 gene is associated with cerebral infarction in Japanese subjects

Authors

  • Noriko Aoi,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Tomohiro Nakayama,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Masayoshi Soma,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Kotoko Kosuge,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Akira Haketa,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Mikano Sato,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Naoyuki Sato,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Shigeaki Hinohara,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Nobutakh Doba,

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Satoshi Asai

    1. Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Department of Advanced Medical Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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Tomohiro Nakayama, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Ooyaguchi-kamimachi, 30-1 Itabashi-ku, JP-173-8610 Tokyo, Japan. E-mail: nakayama.tomohiro@nihon-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Atherosclerosis leads to cerebral infarction (CI) and the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) signaling pathway plays an important role in this process during adult life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the human IGF1 gene and CI in the Japanese population via a case-control study that also included a separate analysis of the two gender groups.

A total of 155 CI patients and 316 controls were genotyped for six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human IGF1 gene (rs2162679, rs7956547, rs2288378, rs2072592, rs978458 and rs6218). All data were analyzed for three separate groups: the total subjects, men and women.

The logistic regression analysis revealed that the GG + AG variant of rs2162679 (P = 0.047), the AA + GA variant of rs2072592 (P = 0.005) and the CC + TC variant of rs6218 (P = 0.015) exhibited a protective effect for CI in the total subject group. For the women and the total subjects groups, the overall distribution of the haplotype established by rs7956547-rs978458 was significantly different between the CI patients and the non-CI subjects. For the total subjects, the frequency of the T-G haplotype (rs7956547-rs978458) was also significantly higher (P = 0.034), whereas the frequency of the T-A haplotype (rs7956547-rs978458) was significantly lower (P = 0.008) in the CI patients versus the non-CI subjects. For women, the frequency of the T-A haplotype (rs7956547-rs978458) was significantly lower (P = 0.021) in the CI patients as compared with the non-CI subjects.

The specific SNPs and haplotypes can be utilized as genetic markers for CI resistance or CI risk.

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