The effect of maximum bite force on alveolar bone morphology

Authors

  • U Thongudomporn,

    1. Udom Thongudomporn, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
      Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong, Alan F. Geater, Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
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  • V Chongsuvivatwong,

    1. Udom Thongudomporn, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
      Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong, Alan F. Geater, Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
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  • AF Geater

    1. Udom Thongudomporn, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
      Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong, Alan F. Geater, Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
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Udom Thongudomporn
Department of Preventive Dentistry
Faculty of Dentistry
Prince of Songkla University
Hatyai
Songkhla 90110
Thailand
E-mail: udom.t@psu.ac.th

Structured Abstract

Authors –  Thongudomporn U, Chongsuvivatwong V, Geater AF

Objectives –  To investigate to what extent maximum bite force contributes to alveolar bone morphology parameters, i.e. alveolar thickness, shape and arch width.

Design –  An observational cross-sectional survey.

Setting and Sample Population –  One hundred and fifty one 12- to 14-year-old students from a secondary school in Hatyai City, Songkhla Province, Thailand.

Material and Methods –  Height, weight and maximum bite force of each subject were recorded. Alveolar bone morphology parameters were measured from study models.

Results –  Maximum bite force moderately correlated with alveolar thickness and shape (= 0.31–0.44, p < 0.001), but weakly correlated with arch width (= 0.03–0.05, p > 0.05). After adjusting for gender and body mass index (BMI), the maximum bite force significantly determined alveolar thickness and shape (p < 0.001), accounting for 10–20% of the variations. Boys were associated with larger posterior arch width (p < 0.01), where BMI was not associated with alveolar bone morphology parameters (p > 0.01) after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing.

Conclusion –  Maximum bite force had a selective influence on alveolar thickness and shape, but not on arch width.

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